by Sheila(Sacramento)

Hello, 

I will appreciate any help you can give. I am a property manager. I have a home in California with a hive problem. They started out in the chimney and moved into the attic. 

I LOVE bees and do not want to kill them. I had a beekeeper come out and after a lot of trouble and a bill for $600, the bees were still there. I have tried everything to make them leave. I have been interested in bees myself for quite a while so I have a little bit of bee education. 

The problem is that I rent this house to a family with several little ones and I am afraid to let this go on while I try to save the bees. My tenant has been very patient with me but they are scared to death of bees, so it has been hard for them. 




I have had swarms at my home and office. I honestly just enjoy the time I have to study these little wonderful guys. I get my entire family in on it. I would let them stay but they never do! 

Why do you suppose I cannot get the little buggers to leave my tenant alone? Is there bee repellent? How do I get rid of pheromones? 

Thank you so much for taking the time to read my question(s). If you have any advice, I would be thrilled.

Thanks again. 

Sheila




One Response to “What to do About Bees in the Attic?”

  • beesonthenet

    Hi Sheila

    I’m sorry about the delay in replying, I’ve trying to think of a sensible answer for you. I doubt they moved from the chimney into the attic, it’s more likely this is a separate issue.

    I’m not sure what you paid the beekeeper $600 to do, but if he didn’t finish the job I think you should take him to task about it. Removing bees alive from a chimney or an attic is a challenge, but if he took on the job I think he should follow it through.

    Unfortunately I don’t think there is a long lasting bee repellent which will keep bees away permanently. As for the pheromones left behind, I don’t think they’re very persistent. People often ask me whether the smell left by bees will attract more. Whilst it will attract bees to some extent, remember that when the bees first arrived, there was no smell to attract them, they came anyway.

    I think the potential for problems might be too great in this case to take any chances. If they can’t be successfully relocated I think you should consider exterminating them. I commend your interest and love for bees but I’m a pragmatist. If you do have to kill this colony, why not redress the balance to the bee population by becoming a beekeeper yourself. The ‘help’ you give them should more than compensate for one errant colony.

    The Bee Guy

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