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Honey Bee Photo Gallery

The honey bee photo gallery shows honey bee photos and bee swarm photos. Incredibly honeybees cluster in all sorts of different situations from which they need to be removed. It never ceases to amaze me how a bee colony can utilize a space to build a new nest.

If it were left up to me I would probably leave many of these where they were. Usually if you don't bother bees, they won't bother you. People are often concerned that a swarm may be of Africanized honeybees (AHB), but this is rarely the case. In my experience African Bees have really not had much impact on the bee population, even the feral honeybees.

Perhaps this would be a page to bookmark - (just press Ctrl - D) Keep checking back since I'll be adding more honey bee photos as I take them.

This swarm was put in the nucleus hive box just a few days earlier.
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This is a photo of a swarm which was put in a nucleus hive box just a few days earlier. The bees have already started building honey combs and the queen bee has laid some eggs. It's amazing how quickly a new swarm start to set up a new bee nest. I failed to put frames in the box initially and by the time I found time to do it, they were way ahead of me.
This is a large honeybee swarm which decided to alight in a tree in a backyard.
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This is a honeybee swarm which decided to alight in a tree in a backyard just about 5 feet off the ground. If only they were all like this.It was relatively easy to shake them off the tree into a box and relate them.

Honeybees in the space under a shed floor.
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I photographed these honeybees in the space under a shed floor where a bee colony had been in the past. They hadn't been there very long but already had a substantial amount of comb. In a situation like this I remove the combs, mount them in hive frames and encourage the bees into the hive box along with the combs, close up the box and relocate them to a new home.

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Photo of a swarm in a bird box. Often bees will take over a bird box or even an owl box. This colony seems too big for the box as many of them are unable to fit inside. It looks as though the swarm misjudged the size of this bird box. They had been there a few weeks, filling the box completely with comb. There wasn't enough room for all the bees once the combs were built. Honey bee swarm in bird box appears too big for the box.
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Honeybees which stopped a renovation project by choosing the space in the roof.
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This honey bee photo is of a swarm of honeybees which stopped a renovation project by choosing the space in the roof to settle. The swarm had to be removed before the roofers would continue work. The work on the roof had to stop and I removed the swarm. The cavity was filled with insulation to ensure another swarm had no chance of a second attempt.
Photo of a bee swarm which was shaken from a tree branch into a box, then emptied in front of the bee hive. The honeybees quickly ran up the ramp into the hive. The bee swarm seem to be very happy to run up hill into the cosy dark box. I often put a frame, with some drawn comb, inside to make it smell like 'home'. Bee swarm shaken from a tree branch into a box, then emptied in front of the bee hive.
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Honey bee swarm on the flightdeck of USS Midway
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This photo was taken on the flight deck of USS Midway. I went to collect the honey bee swarm so visitors wouldn't get stung. How often do you get the chance to have a photo in a beesuit on the USS Midway? The swarm was collected near the stern on the deck itself. I'm sure there are many places on board which would offer a cosy space for them to take up residence.
Roof-top bee photo. A swarm had taken up residence inside the chimney. The top was blocked with a board with a wire cone 'escape' which is called a trap out. All the bees ended up inside the hive box after a few weeks. The process usually takes 6 - 8 weeks as it takes this long for the queen to stop laying eggs and all the remaining eggs to hatch and the bees emerge. Honey bee swarm took up residence inside the chimney.
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Large honey bee swarm under eaves of house.
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Honeybee swarms often seem to like to settle just under the eaves of a house, often on the second floor of a two store house. House owners are understandably nervous that they might find a way into the attic. It's not unusual, in warmer climates, for swarms to build combs right under eaves in places like this.

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Click here to see more bee removal and beekeeping photos. Sometimes, in the excitement of the situation, I don't remember my camera so I try to take good pictures with my phone. However, often I'm so absorbed by the problems which collecting a swarm can present, I don't think of it until it's too late. When I'm on my way home or to an apiary to hive the new swarm, I have that "Do'h!" moment.

Click here for more beekeeping and bee removal photos


Sometimes, in the excitement of the situation, I don't remember my camera so I try to take pictures with my Google G1. I think you can't have too many photos in a honey bee photo gallery. However, often I'm so absorbed by the problems which collecting a swarm can present, I don't think of it until it's too late. When I'm on my way home or to an apiary to hive the new swarm, I have that "Do'h!" moment.

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